Glossary

Supply-Based Learning

Supply-based learning is a way of a professional learning model to perform a task that involves using resources and tools in the supply base.

Table of Contents
Share it

We use the lecture-based method to teach students in engineering programs. This means that students sit and listen to the instructor talk about a subject, then take notes on what they have learned. While this method works well for some students' performance, others need help paying attention or retaining information presented in lectures. In addition, classes can be tedious and monotonous.

Leading some people to fall asleep or lose focus while trying to absorb what's being taught. As a result of these issues with lecture-based learning methods, many engineering schools demand the Supply-Based Learning (SBL) model as an alternative training technique for advanced engineering concepts.

SBL completely replaces lectures with problem-driven instruction. Where students work on projects by themselves at their own pace. Instead of sitting in rows listening passively to instructors talk about the material without having any hands-on experience or interaction with each other during class time.

supply-based learning

Supply-Based Learning (SBL) teaches advanced engineering concepts.

Supply-Based Learning (SBL) is a method of teaching effective advanced engineering concepts. The SBL method comprises three basic parts:

  • Reading the textbook and solving homework problems.
  • Completing practical assignments. These are groups of problems meant to be solved together, often using the same problem-solving process as in homework exercises. You can do these practical assignments either individually or with a partner or group of students.
  • Taking tests on material from both the textbook and from practical assignments.

SBL replaces lectures with problem-driven instruction.

SBL completely replaces lectures with strategic problem-driven based learning. It is not just a supplement to lessons. It is an entirely different way of teaching. SBL can be used in any discipline and level, from high school to graduate school.

How many instructors have covered the content in a lecture more than once?

How many instructors have covered the content in a lecture more than once? If you are like most people, your answer is probably "not many." But here's the thing: students learn better when engaged in the learning process. That means that if you want your students to remember what you taught them. There has got to be some activity involved besides sitting back and listening.

If students aren't active participants in their discovery process of knowledge acquisition. Then this reduces our capacity for retaining information long-term and applying it later on down the road. This is why course designers emphasize active learning strategies today—and why we recommend using these tools at every opportunity!

Students' level of understanding

Students' level of understanding is not uniform across subject matter.

There are many reasons for this, but it's important to note that students have different backgrounds or experiences. Some will have more professional experience with some topics than others, and some may better understand certain concepts than others. This means you can't expect every student to be able to perform at the same level in every class—or even within a single lesson on a single topic.

Students can spend less time on specific topics.

Students can spend less time on specific topics and more on unfamiliar ones. So, for example, if you're teaching a history class and one student is interested in the topic of World War II, he'd be able to spend more time studying that particular era of history than those who are not as interested in it. The same goes for students struggling with a specific topic: they can spend more time learning about it until they feel confident enough to move on without further assistance.

SBL allows students to learn in ways that best suit their learning style.

  • Some students learn best by listening, while others learn by doing. For example, a student who learns by listening might have an easier time understanding a lecture on supply-based learning than another student who learns by doing.
  • Some students learn best by reading, while others learn by watching. A student with a strong reading habit may find it easier to understand the material as it is presented in writing format than someone who prefers to watch videos or listen to audio files instead of reading written material.
  • Some students learn best by talking, while others learn by writing. Students who prefer discussions over essays may find SBL more accessible than other forms of education. This type of teaching allows them to speak their minds and ask questions without feeling intimidated or embarrassed about speaking up in class, which can happen when discussing difficult topics for some people.
  • Some students learn best by working together with other people, while others do better when working alone. SBL also accommodates this preference because students often have opportunities for collaboration and individual work on assignments within each supply chain activity. Such as writing blog posts or creating presentations based on what they've learned from their research-based projects related to their chosen topic area. For instance: "how technology impacts society."

Students gain experience through lab work.

Lab work allows students to explore the design, debugging, and troubleshooting skills needed for success in the course.

Because of this, lab work is a great way for students to gain experience working as part of a team. It also gives them experience communicating with other students on their team and working independently. Finally, it allows them to interact directly with instructors and TAs who can provide guidance when needed.

The SBL method requires frequent student testing.

The SBL method requires frequent student testing, which provides accountability for the students to keep up with their studies. Students must be able to test their knowledge of course material regularly and are expected to be prepared for class. A student needs to learn the material before class to be able to use the content learned in previous classes as a foundation for building upon that knowledge.

SBL provides a better education than lecture-based courses

In an SBL course, you are responsible for your learning. You decide what you want to learn when you want to learn it and how you will learn it. While this may seem challenging at first, most students who have used SBL report that they enjoy the freedom and flexibility of this type of course structure.

This is because in an supply-based learning environment:

  • Students can learn at their own pace and begin working on content before class starts. This is particularly beneficial if a class size larger than 30 students or multiple sections are offered during the same term (such as during the fall semester). In such cases, students would be required to take notes on each section separately, which could prove difficult if they were trying to keep track of all their assignments from different lecturers at once! With SBL, however, all projects are completed through Moodle. One central place where all course material can be accessed online without having access restrictions. Such as those found in traditional campuses where only those enrolled in certain classes with prerequisites get access.

Conclusion

This article has helped to clarify some of the misconceptions about SBL. First, it's a standard teaching method but rather a way to improve the learning process for all students, regardless of their background or experience level. Second, SBL allows students to learn in ways that best suit their learning style and gives them time to develop critical thinking skills through lab work.

Share it
Related learning terms
What is Chief Learning Officer (CLO)?

Discover the role of a Chief Learning Officer (CLO) and the responsibilities, skills, qualifications, career path, certifications, and opportunities for CLOs.

What is Courseware?

Learn about Courseware, an educational material in electronic format with interactive activities, quizzes, and videos for students.

Just-in-Time Training

Just-in-time training is a process which helps us immensely. Just-in-time training has helped me to do my job better.

Successive Approximation Model

Learn about the Successive Approximation Model (SAM), a widely used method for designing and developing effective e-learning content. Discover its key elements, benefits, and how it can be applied to ensure your e-learning content is tailored to the specific needs of your learners.

Learning Terms

Subscribe to Teachfloor Blog

Get actionable advice read by over 20,000 professional educators every week.
I agree to receive communications from Teachfloor. I can unsubscribe at any time.